My sons school was unexpectedly closed for the day & he was sent home, I couldn’t arrange childcare, do I have to use annual leave or time out of the book to care for him?

A police officer may take time off because of the unexpected disruption or termination of arrangements for the care of a dependant, or

To deal with an incident which involves a child of the member and which occurs unexpectedly in a period during which an educational establishment, which the child attends, is responsible for him/her.

Leave taken as time off for dependants shall be treated as duty, but does not apply unless the member tells his/her chief officer the reason for his/her absence as soon as reasonably practicable. Best practice would be to inform a line supervisor of your circumstances ASAP after you become aware of it.

A “dependant” means, in relation to a member of a police force:

  • a spouse
  • a child
  • a parent
  • a person who lives in the same household as the member, otherwise than by reason of being his employee, tenant, lodger or boarder

This also covers when a dependant falls ill, gives birth or is injured or assaulted or in consequence of the death of a dependant.

As a CBRN trained officer am I insured?

The answers have been provided by the Association of British Insurers (ABI) and are based on indications of market trends. The ABI advises that any emergency service worker who has concerns about their policy should first consult their policy document and consult with their insurer for any clarifications. The answers have been provided by the Association of British Insurers (ABI) and are based on indications of market trends. The ABI advises that any emergency service worker who has concerns about their policy should first consult their policy document and consult with their insurer for any clarifications.
  1. Will my insurance policy payout in the event of a terrorist event?

    Most individually purchased, stand-alone life insurance products do not contain terrorism exclusion clauses and would payout in the event of death in a terrorist incident. Health insurance policies, such as critical illness, have a number of standard exclusions and whether these would apply to a specific terrorist incident would depend on the particular circumstances. Individuals should read the terms and conditions of their policies and contact their insurers if concerned. War and terrorism are usually excluded from cover for personal insurance policies such as personal accident insurance, and for creditor insurance policies, such as mortgage protection.

  2. Will my insurance premiums rise if I declare that I have been trained in decontamination processes or other training that may indicate that I would be deployed in response to a terrorist incident?

    Insurance policies are based on individual circumstances. Workers who undertake particularly high-risk jobs may, in some circumstances, attract a higher premium for certain insurance products such as personal accident insurance. It is unlikely that new training or roles will affect premiums for emergency service workers. For life insurance, for example, insurers do not expect emergency service workers to declare any specialist training which may be deployed in response to a terrorist incident. A small number of products use occupation as a key determinant of risk and premiums for emergency service workers could change if their role changes, although this has not been applied to members of the armed services trained in CBRN warfare, for example. For these policies, any change in individual circumstances should be notified to insurers.

  3. Will my employer compensate for any sum not paid out because of a terrorism exclusion?

    Most individually purchased, stand-alone life insurance products do not contain terrorism exclusion clauses. These policies would payout if an emergency service worker were killed as a result of a terrorist incident. Separately, terrorism exclusions in personal insurance policies (such as personal accident insurance) and creditor insurance (such as mortgage protection) apply to all policy holders. Emergency service workers are not treated differently from other policyholders in relation to this exclusion.

Where can I find out more about the New Police Pension Scheme (NPPS)?

The New Police Pension Scheme came into force in April 2006. All new joiners, entrants and transferees from other police bodies like British Transport Police/Ministry of Defence Police joining after this date will have no option but to join this scheme (note: transferees who move between Home Department forces under old Reg A16 will remain in the current scheme, also people on an approved career breaks who return to duty).

I have been asked to perform as an Acting Sergeant/Inspector but have been told there is a qualifying period. Also, am I entitled to overtime? If so, at what rate?

Each financial year, you are required to work 10 days (or 80 hours) for which no extra payment is made.Acting Sergeants and Inspectors are entitled to Temporary Duty Allowance. Any overtime incurred whilst acting will be paid at your substantive rank – i.e. 1) an Acting Sergeant’s overtime will be paid at Constable’s rates and 2) an Acting Inspector’s overtime will be paid at Sergeant’s rates but only during the first 10 working days and on any Rest Days or Bank Holidays during the entire period of Acting. No overtime is payable on a normal working day once the first 10 working days of Acting have been completed.

If you are an officer who has been promoted to a temporary rank, there is no requirement to work a qualifying period and you will in fact progress through the pay scales of your temporary rank until you revert back to your substantive rank. If you are promoted again to a temporary rank, you will automatically start at the same pay point of that rank where you left off.

How do I join the police federation?

All serving police officers up to the rank of Chief Inspector are members of the police federation. There are two types of membership. First, as a non subscribing member which is automatic when you are attested.

The other type of membership which brings additional benefits is that of a subscribing member. The cost currently for the latter is £21.58 a month. The main benefit of this type of membership is the availablity of legal advice and support during discipline cases and employment disputes.

In addition you can claim tax relief on your subscriptions, the monthly amount deducted won’t reduce but the Inland Revenue will adjust your tax coding to take into account the current amount of relief.

Contact the Federation Office 0844 612 0012 for application forms.

What allowances am I entitled to?

Overnight Allowance (Residential Courses Only) – £4.43per night with a maximum of £17.77 per week, however if the officer has to attend a weeks course they can claim the preceeding Sunday night at £4.43.

Force Mileage Rate is 40 pence per mile.

Refreshment/Subsistance – must be reasonable and receipted.

Flat Rate Expense Allowance – £140.00 from 6.4.2008 which is offset against your tax code.

Also, if you are injured on duty, an officer can claim for the reimbursement of medical charges (Reg 35). The Force must recognise it as an IOD.